Roxana Rotundo, Nicolás Di Blasi, Sofía Garrido, César Sabroso, Juana Torres, Pedro Siaretta and Héctor Rodríguez at the end of production

VIP 2000 TV: Amores Que Engañan is a sample of what WAWA is capable to achieve
Maribel Ramos-Weiner|11 de mayo de 2022

The first original production of Lifetime Latin America, Amores Que Engañan (10x60’), which debuts this Saturday the 14th is for Roxana Rotundo, CEO of VIP 2000 TV, is the implementation of “what we’ve been repeating for several years at WAWA (Worldwide Audiovisual Women's Association.) Amores Que Engañan epitomizes what WAWA can achieve: the unity of executive women who are willing to work together aiming at the same goal, to make a production with 70% female within the production team”.

Amores Que Engañan was co-produced with VIP 2000 TV, Casablanca Brazil, and Yahayra Films from Mexico.

“We met a challenge. We are arriving in a very positive way with this great project that leads us to corroborate that production and work among women are wonderful," said Carmen Larios, Senior VP of Content at Lifetime Latin America, who dedicated the series to José Manuel Pagani, executive of the industry who passed away in February and whose last project was the consultancy for this series of unitaries.

“We met a challenge. This great project corroborates in very positive way that production and work among women are wonderful," said Carmen Larios, Senior VP of Content at Lifetime Latin America, who dedicated the series to José Manuel Pagani, executive of the industry who passed away in February and whose last project was as a consultant in this series of unitaries.

“This series is dedicated to someone very special to us and our company, José Manuel Pagani, who was devoted to working with us on the stories. It was his last editorial and creative project. He used to welcome us with great affection, listening to what we had to say. He read the scripts and gave us his feedback. So, we decided to dedicate the project to him, because we recruited him due to all his experience on novels and narratives towards women. He was one of the members of the Lifetime and A&E content committee,” Larios said.

Juana María Torres, executive director of Original Production for Lifetime Latin America, said that the casting of such an international group of figures was a great challenge. “We had 10 wonderful scripts created with a team of writers in Miami, Buenos Aires, Mexico, Venezuela; but we needed talents that would give life to our characters and we decided not only to think on Mexican talent. We are looking for the great figures of international stature from all over Latin America. We recruited talent from eight different countries: Mexico, Venezuela, Cuba, Colombia, Puerto Rico, Peru, Argentina, and Brazil. It was really ambitious. The key to recruit them was that they read the scripts, when they did, they said, "Yes, I'm going to Guadalajara, Mexico because I want to be part of the first original production of Lifetime Latin America and because of the message of each episode."

For Larios, the goal is to expand Lifetime's original production in the region and they would love to have a second season. “We have many ideas of what it could be, but we still haven't decided,” she said.

Torres highlighted the multicultural mix of the team: the director Nicolás di Blasi came from Miami; all post-production is done in Casablanca Brazil and the music is from Onceloops Argentina. "This is the best example of how you can work as a team at the Latin American level to have successful content.”

For Rotundo, another great example of WAWA's teamwork spirit was to achieve, through Maria Eugencia Muci and Sebastián Mellino from Onceloops, that the Valeria Lynch sang the main theme of the series. “Mellino composed the song in one night and at 3 in the morning he gave it to Valeria, who said ‘when do we record it?’ and 48 hours later the song was ready. A week later the theme was integrated into the first episode.”
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